Candid Moments with Devika Khosla, The Works Interiors

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Q1.Why did you choose to get into interior design?

My father was a fighter pilot with the Indian Air Force, which had us frequently moving around the country every few years. Every time we moved, my mother would set up the new place and make it feel like home in a matter of weeks. Her aesthetic sense built the foundation for my love for design and a fondness for designing houses. Formal education in the technicality of the subject and work experience helped me learn, understand, and execute the work better.

Q.What does your design process look like, and where do you seek inspiration from?

At TWI, we believe that it is vital to understand our client’s ideas and thoughts. Hence, we talk and get to know them personally. These interactive conversations have become an integral part of our process where we ideate together, which helps us with our design solution.

My inspiration comes from reading and travelling, and I believe that simple things are the answer to complex ideas, more often than not.

Q.Is there a place or location where you draw your creative energy from?

The ocean! Raj and I are passionate scuba divers and take a diving trip every couple of months.

Connecting with the ocean, the quiet time underwater gives us immense peace and calm. We come back rejuvenated and centred. Each time I am by the sea, I am reminded of Lao Tzu’s words- “Be like water- Nothing in the world is as soft and yielding as water. Yet for dissolving the hard and inflexible nothing can surpass it.”

Q.Which architect or designer would you like to have a conversation with if given a chance?

It is difficult to choose one. From the past, it would be Charles and Ray Eames, and from the present would be Arianna Lelimami and Chiara Di Pinto of StudioPepe.

Q.What is your design preference – traditional design practices or futuristic design?

A combination of both, in a collaborative way. At TWI, we have adept artisans, carpenters and polishers manifesting our contemporary vision through traditional skills and craft techniques.

Q.What is the one thing you like and dislike about the architecture and design industry?

I love that young designers are getting conscious about using sustainable materials. One means is employing local artisans with traditional craftsmanship skills to shape beautiful pieces of furniture and spaces.

However, I see a significant gap in being able to achieve the said sustainability because architecture is expensive and, therefore, not reachable to the masses. To change that, we need the government and the industry to work in tandem and come up with better eco-friendly yet aesthetic solutions accessible to everyone.

Q.What is that one piece of your creation that you are most proud of? And, why?

That’s a tough one! I enjoy all my designs, but I am also critical about my work. I love different projects and pieces at different times. Currently, I am in love with our project in Kasauli that we have just completed, and my favourite piece of furniture is the Wave Console designed for Treetops.

Wave Console designed for Treetops

Q.Share with us a bit about the projects that you are currently working on.

We are designing a holiday home in the hills of Kasauli and another one in Goa. It is fascinating to see how both residences are shaping up so differently despite having a similar purpose because of the local context- the climate and weather.

Q.When not being an interior designer, are there any activities that you do which subconsciously impact your design process?

Yes, scuba diving. Witnessing the delicate ecosystem impacts our thought process, which is one of the reasons why our projects are environmentally friendly.

Q.Share with us a bit about the projects that you are currently working on.

We are designing a holiday home in the hills of Kasauli and another one in Goa. It is fascinating to see how both residences are shaping up so differently despite having a similar purpose because of the local context- the climate and weather.

Written by Team TDJI

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